TS Module 15 practice problems: sum of squared errors


TS Module 15 practice problems: sum of squared errors

Author
Message
NEAS
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)Supreme Being (5.7K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Posts: 4.2K, Visits: 1.2K

TS Module 15 Forecasting basics

 

(The attached PDF file has better formatting.)

 

Time series practice problems: sum of squared errors

 

The optimal ARIMA model has the lowest mean squared error for its forecasts. The variance of the error terms is not known exactly, since the residuals depend on fitted values from the ARIMA process.

 

Illustration: For an AR(1) process, if we select μ and φ, we know the expected values for periods 2 and subsequent. For an MA(1) process, even if we select μ and θ, we don’t know the residual in Period 1, so we don’t know the expected value in Period 2, the residual in Period 2, and so forth. In practice, this is not a material problem. The uncertainty in the Period 1 residual does not have a material effect on the expected values several periods later.

 

We estimate the variance from the observed values and the assumed ARIMA parameters.

The exercise below calculates the sum of squared errors. Focus on the following items:

 


!       If the time series is stationary, no differences are needed.

!       If the time series is a non-stationary ARIMA process, convert it to an ARMA process by taking first differences. In some cases, one might need second differences.

 


 

Starting the Computations

 

The exam problem will give values for all periods and μ, φ, and θ parameters.

 


 

!      The estimate for the first period depends on the previous values (for an autoregressive process) or the previous residuals (for a moving average process).

!      We can’t estimate the residuals for the first period.

"      The problem may give this residual.

"      If the problem does not give this residual, assume it is zero. 

!      The exam problem will say to compute the sum of squared errors for Periods 2–N.


 

 

We can compute forecasts and residuals for Periods 2–N for an autoregressive process.

 

The Period 2 forecast for a moving average process depends on the residual in Period 1.  We don’t know the Period 1 residual, so we can not compute the forecast or residual for Period 2. Similarly, we can not compute the exact residuals for any future period.

 

After several periods, the forecast depends only slightly on the residual in Period 1. We assume that all values before Period 1 were the mean and all residuals before Period 1 were zero. This is the simplest way to start, though not the most accurate.

 

Using these assumptions, the residual for Period 1 is too large.

 


 

!      We don’t use the residual computed for Period 1 in the sum of squared errors, since it would over-state the result.

!      The over-statement decreases for later residuals (Periods 2+), unless θ1 is large.

"      If θ1 = 1, the error repeats in each period.

"      Practical moving average processes have low θ1.

!      Know that the result is slightly over-stated. Advanced techniques exist for a better estimate of the early residuals, but they are not covered in the on-line course.


 

 

 


 

Know the logic of the estimation for an MA(1) process.

 

!       We don’t have an estimate for Period 1, so we don’t have a residual.

!       Without the residual for the first term, we can not estimate the second term.

!       To simplify the estimate of σ2, we assume the first residual is zero.

!       This assumption slightly over-states the residual for the second term.

!       If the first residual is zero, the second residual does not depend on θ1.


 

 

In practice, we don’t know θ1 a priori. We select θ1 to minimize the sum of squared errors.

 


 

!       The exam problems compute the sum of squared errors for a given θ1.

!       Your student project may use statistical software to minimize the squared errors.


 

 

Expect an exam problem giving you an ARMA or ARIMA process and asking for the sum of squared errors. The process may be autoregressive, moving average, or both.

 


 

Exercise 15.1: Sum of Squared Errors, ARIMA(0,1,1) Model

 

We use an ARIMA(0,1,1) model yt – yt-1 = μ + εt – θ1 εt-1.

 

t

yt

0

7.50

1

8.00

2

12.00

3

10.30

4

2.00

5

7.50

 


 

!       An ARMA process is yt = μ + εt – θ1 εt-1.

!       An ARIMA process is yt – yt-1 = μ + εt – θ1 εt-1.

!       The first differences of the ARIMA model form an MA(1) process.

!       The ARIMA time series has six observations: Periods 0 through 5.

!       The ARMA model of first differences has five values.


 

 

t

yt

yt – yt-1

0

7.50

 

1

8.00

0.50

2

12.00

4.00

3

10.30

-1.70

4

2.00

-8.30

5

7.50

5.50

Total

 

0.00

 


 

!      The MA(1) process underlying the ARIMA(0,1,1) time series has a mean μ = δ. 

!      The mean of first differences is the expected change in the values of the time series.


 

 


 

A.     What is the estimated mean of the MA(1) model of the first differences?

B.     What is the forecasted first difference for period 2?

C.    What is the forecasted value for Period 2?

D.    What is the residual in Period 2?

E.     What is the forecasted first difference for period 3?

F.     What is the forecasted value for period 3?

G.    What is the error term for period 3?

H.    What are the forecasts and residual for periods 4 and 5?

I.        What is the sum of squared errors for periods 2 through 5?

 


 

{The following paragraphs explain why we use the sum of squared errors starting with Period 2 instead of Period 1. The exam does not test optimal fitting of a moving average process.}

 

Terms: The sum of squared errors, error sum of squares, and residual sum of squares are synonyms. We use the acronym ESS, or error sum of squares, since it is not confusing. The acronym RSS stands for regression sum of squares (most authors) and regression sum of squares (Fox textbook).

 

We did not predict the Period 0 value with the ARIMA model, so we do not include it in the sum of squared errors. To predict Period 0, we need values for Period –1. We may assume a residual of zero for this period to predict future periods, but we don’t include this assumed residual of zero to measure the goodness-of-fit.

 

The first term for the underlying ARMA process is Period 1. To predict this value, we need the ARMA residual for Period 0, which we do not have. We assume the expected value for Period 1 is the observed value, so its residual is zero. This assumption slightly distorts the sum of squared errors for the subsequent terms, but the error is not material.

 

We minimize the sum of squared errors to select the optimal θ1. But the residual in Period 1 does not depend on θ1, since the previous residual is assumed to be zero. Some statisticians do not include Period 1 in the residual sum of squares, since it does not help determine θ1. Excluding Period 1 reduces the degrees of freedom.

 

The sum of squared errors starting at the second period, S(θ1) = , depends on θ1.  To fit the ARIMA model, we choose θ1 to minimize the sum of squared errors. We write the residual sum of squares as a function of θ1 and find the minimum of the function.

 

Solving for θ1 requires non-linear regression. Linear regression solves for the response variable (the forecasts) based on known explanatory variables (residuals). For a moving average process:

 


 

!      The residuals depend on the estimates (fitted values) for each period.

!      The fitted values depend on the residuals and θ1.

!      We estimate θ1 by minimizing the sum of squared errors.


 

 

Contrast this with fitting an AR(1) autoregressive process:

 


 

!      The fitted values depend on the past values and φ1.

!      The fitted values do not depend on past residuals.


 

 

This differences between autoregressive and moving average processes is less relevant for modern statistical software. We now use numerical techniques to optimize θ1.

 


 

!      We evaluate the sum of squared errors at various values of θ1.

!      We choose the value of θ1 that minimizes the sum of squared errors.


 

 

Exam problems do not solve for θ1 by numerical methods.

 


 

!      They specify a value for θ1 and solve for the sum of squared errors.

!      Know how to compute the sum of squared errors and the degrees of freedom.


 

 


 

Part A:  The time series is ARIMA(0,1,1), or IMA(1), so the first differences are an MA(1) model, for which μ = δ. The last term of the time series equals the first term. The sum of the first differences is zero, so the mean of the first differences, δ = μ = 0.

 

Note: Cryer and Chan use the symbol θ0 in place of δ.

 

Take heed: This practice problem has a drift of zero for the ARIMA process. In practice, we use ARIMA processes when the drift is not zero.

 

Part B:  By assumption, the error term in Period 0 is zero.  The expected error term in any period is also zero. The forecasted first difference for Period 1 is 0 – 0.8 × 0 = 0. In general, the forecasted first difference for Period 1 is the mean of the MA(1) model.

 

Part C: The forecasted value for Period 1 is the actual value in Period 0 plus the mean of the MA(1) model of first differences. The forecasted value for Period 1 is 7.5 + 0 = 7.5.

 

Part D: The residual is the actual value minus the forecasted value. The residual in Period 1 is 8.0 – 7.5 = 0.5.

 

Part E: This forecast depends on θ1. We evaluate the residual sum of squares at θ1 = 0.8. The first difference for period 1 has an error term of 0.5, so the forecasted first difference for period 2 is –0.8 × 0.5 = –0.4.

 

Part F: The value for period 1 is 8. The forecasted first difference is –0.4, so the forecasted value for period 2 is 8 – 0.4 = 7.6.

 

Part G: The observed value in period 2 is 12, so the residual is 12 – 7.6 = 4.4. If the value is 1 higher, the first difference is also 1 higher, so the residual for the first differences in period 2 is 4.4.

 

Part H: We compute the forecasts and residuals for each period in the same fashion, shown in the table below.

 

Part I: The right-most column of the table shows the squares of the residuals. The sum of squares is the 69.513 in the last row.

 


 

The table below shows all the values.

 

t

yt

εt

ít

εt2

0

7.5

 

 

1

8.0

0.5

 

 

2

12.0

4.4

7.600

19.360

3

10.3

1.82

8.480

3.312

4

2.0

-6.844

8.844

46.840

5

7.5

0.0248

7.475

0.001

Total

 

-0.5992

 

69.513

 

For regression analysis, the error sum of squares depends on the regression coefficients. We choose coefficients to minimize the error sum of squares. The explanatory variables for each data point are known, so the error sum of squares is clearly defined. 

 

For time series analysis, the residual sum of squares depends on unknown prior values.

 


 

!       For an AR(p) model, we don’t know the p values before the time series begins, so we don’t know the residuals for the first p values.

!       For an MA(q) model, we don’t know the q expected values before the time series begins, so we don’t know the residuals for the first q values.


 

 

One might say that there are no actual values or expected values before the time series begins. This is not correct: the time series is a sample of values. 

 

Illustration: We have a time series of average daily temperature for 1/1/20X7 – 12/31/20X7. If we use an ARMA(1,1) process, the daily temperature on day t is a function of the daily temperatures on day t-1 and the expected daily temperature on day t-1 (which gives the residual for 12/31/20X7).

 


 

!       Without the actual daily temperature on 12/31/20X6 and the expected daily temperature on 12/31/20X6, we can not derive the expected daily temperature on 1/1/20X7.

!       Without the expected daily temperature on 1/1/20X7, we don’t know the residual on 1/1/20X7, so we can not derive the expected daily temperature on 1/2/20X7.

 


Attachments
Woody
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)Forum Newbie (3 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3, Visits: 1

Part E: This forecast depends on θ1. We evaluate the residual sum of squares at θ1 = 0.8.>


How exactly do We evaluate the residual sum of squares at θ1 = 0.8?

[NEAS: The table shows the computations. Assume previous residuals are zero and use the value of theta with the observations to compute the residuals for the observed values.]


Tom McNamara III
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)Forum Newbie (6 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 6, Visits: 1

Regarding question 15.1

It says, in the solution, that we need to use Non-linear regression to get θ1.  However module 13 explicity states that we are not  responsible for non-linear regression.  So my question to the NEAS would be "will θ1 be given in these types of problems since we are not required to know non-linear regression?"

Also, part B asks for the forecasted 1st difference for period 2.  I think questions parts B through G are asking for 1 forecast too far.  The solution for B calculates the forecasted 1st difference of period 1.

Part E asks for the forecasted 1st difference for period 3.  The solution is calculating the forecasted 1st difference for period 2. So we should be calculating forecasts for period 2.

[NEAS: To solve for the optimal value of theta, we use non-linear regression. This posting just shows how to compute the sum of squared errors. All the forecasts are one period ahead.]

 

 

 

 

 



Tom McNamara III
apgarrity
Junior Member
Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)Junior Member (16 reputation)

Group: Awaiting Activation
Posts: 13, Visits: 393
I may be missing something obvious after long weekend of studying, but if you could provide me with the calculation of the .8 in Part B that'd be greatly appreciated.
GO
Merge Selected
Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...





Reading This Topic


Login
Existing Account
Email Address:


Password:


Social Logins

  • Login with twitter
  • Login with twitter
Select a Forum....











































































































































































































































Neas-Seminars

Search